Quack Medicine and Junk Science

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Quack Medicine and Junk Science

Postby Colonel Sun » Fri Jun 25, 2010 12:06 am

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Postby Marcus » Fri Jun 25, 2010 12:46 am

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Postby Colonel Sun » Fri Jun 25, 2010 12:53 am

Marcus wrote:Quack medicine and junk science . . . :oops:


The FDA doing it's job. Science - evidence based medicine and food safety.
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Postby Marcus » Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:14 am

Colonel Sun wrote:. . food safety.


Food safety . . . :oops: :oops:
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Postby Marcus » Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:18 am

Real junk [food] science . . . :oops: :oops: :oops:

********************

Note: The essay linked above was also included in Library of America's American Food Writing.
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Postby Colonel Sun » Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:22 am

Marcus wrote:
Colonel Sun wrote:. . food safety.


Food safety . . . :oops: :oops:


You're citing rense.com? An infamous conspiracy theory site with a known strong anti-semitic bias.

I'd be blushing too.
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Postby Marcus » Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:34 am

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Postby kmich » Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:50 am

Good thread concept. Evidence and outcome based medicine is the only way we will be able to begin to get our healthcare costs and services under control and we really have a long way to go on that. We need a public that has a basic understanding of scientific evidence and respect for that and that is not something we really have right now.

Many times I have had discussions with patients citing the evidence that a particular test or procedure will not add to their care or to that of one of their family, but they frquenty come up with anecdotes such as "my aunt so and so had this done and it saved her life," will threaten "if you won't do it, I will find someone else who will," or will cite some bogus article, internet scam, or product promotional material.

The temptation to engage in quack medical practice outside of the evidence is huge when there is money to be made and you have a patient population who are often credulous, demanding, not comprehending or respecting the available evidence, and scared.
Last edited by kmich on Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Marcus » Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:52 am

More on junk science:

Americans are confused, and I will tell you why. The answer, discussed in Part IV, has to do with how health information is generated and communicated and who controls such activities. Because I have been behind the scenes generating health information for so long, I have seen what really goes on—and I’m ready to tell the world what is wrong with the system. The distinctions between government, industry, science and medicine have become blurred. The distinctions between making a profit and promoting health have become blurred. The problems with the system do not come in the form of Hollywood-style corruption. The problems are much more subtle, and yet much more dangerous. The result is massive amounts of misinformation, for which average American consumers pay twice. They provide the taxmoney to do the research, and then they provide the money for their health care to treat their largely preventable diseases.

—from the Introduction to The China Study.
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Postby Marcus » Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:57 am

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Postby Doc » Fri Jun 25, 2010 2:00 am

Colonel Sun wrote:
Marcus wrote:Quack medicine and junk science . . . :oops:


The FDA doing it's job. Science - evidence based medicine and food safety.


Unethical (quack?) Medicine that the FDA allows

In recent years, there's been a dramatic increase in the number of children being diagnosed (4000%)with serious psychiatric disorders and prescribed medications that are just beginning to be tested in children. The drugs can cause serious side effects, and virtually nothing is known about their long-term impact. "It's really to some extent an experiment, trying medications in these children of this age," child psychiatrist Dr. Patrick Bacon tells FRONTLINE. "It's a gamble. And I tell parents there's no way to know what's going to work
.

My guess is that very few psychiatrists give the parents any warning. Yet the FDA allows this.

Watch the video.
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Postby Colonel Sun » Fri Jun 25, 2010 2:12 am

Marcus wrote:Integrative medicine . . . :)


The "Your trusted health advisor" logo on his self-promotional site is most reassuring.
Last edited by Colonel Sun on Fri Jun 25, 2010 2:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Colonel Sun » Fri Jun 25, 2010 2:16 am

kmich wrote:Good thread concept. Evidence and outcome based medicine is the only way we will be able to begin to get our healthcare costs and services under control and we really have a long way to go on that. We need a public that has a basic understanding of scientific evidence and respect for that and that is not something we really have right now.

Many times I have had discussions with patients citing the evidence that a particular test or procedure will not add to their care or to that of one of their family, but they frquenty come up with anecdotes such as "my aunt so and so had this done and it saved her life," will threaten "if you won't do it, I will find someone else who will," or will cite some bogus article, internet scam, or product promotional material.

The temptation to engage in quack medical practice outside of the evidence is huge when there is money to be made and you have a patient population who are often credulous, demanding, not comprehending or respecting the available evidence, and scared.


Judging by the other post here, you and your colleagues have your work cut out for you.

Trivial example. Patients insisting that they be prescribed antibiotics for viral infections [while not presenting with secondary opportunistic bacterial infections].
Last edited by Colonel Sun on Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Marcus » Fri Jun 25, 2010 2:41 am

Colonel Sun wrote:
Marcus wrote:Integrative medicine . . . :)
The "Your trusted health advisor" logo on his self-promotional site is most reassuring.


That's the second time now that you've resorted to a "kill the messenger" defense—once against a site and now against Dr. Weil. . :oops:

Introduction

Andrew Weil was born June 8, 1942 in Philadelphia, PA to parents of German and Ukrainian descent. His parents owned a millinery store.[2] He attended both college and medical school at Harvard University. As an undergraduate, Weil majored in botany and wrote his thesis on the narcotic properties of nutmeg,[3] and also served as an editor of the Harvard Crimson and the Harvard Lampoon.[4] After medical school, Weil did not seek residency. He completed a medical internship at Mt. Zion Hospital in San Francisco and subsequently worked for a year with the National Institute of Mental Health. From 1971-1974, he traveled throughout South America as a fellow for the Institute of Current World Affairs.[5] He published his first book, The Natural Mind, in 1972. Weil has since written or co-written nine books, and was a regular contributor to High Times magazine from 1975 to 1983.[6] His early works explored altered states of consciousness, but he has since expanded his scope to encompass healthy lifestyles and health care in general. In the last ten years, Weil has focused much of his work on the health concerns of older Americans. His book, Healthy Aging, looks at growing older from a physical, social and cross-cultural perspective, and emphasizes that aging cannot be reversed, but can be accompanied by good health, "serenity, wisdom, and its own kind of power and grace". His latest book, Why our Health Matters, is focused on health care reform.

Medical philosophy

Weil's general view is that mainstream and alternative medicine are complementary approaches that should be utilized in conjunction with one another. Specifically, he maintains that mainstream medicine is well-suited to crisis intervention, whereas alternative medicine is best utilized for prevention and health maintenance. He promotes integrative medicine as a combination of both approaches. Nutrition, exercise, and stress reduction are emphasized in almost all of Weil's health works.
Weil has acknowledged the influence of many individuals, philosophical and spiritual ideas, and techniques on his approach to alternative medicine. Among the individuals who strongly influenced Weil's professional and personal life is the late osteopath Robert C. Fulford, who specialized in cranial manipulation.[7][8]

Weil has previously expressed opposition to the War on Drugs, citing the benefits of many banned plants. He promotes the medical use of whole-plants as a less problematic approach to treatment than synthetic pharmaceuticals. Weil has also written about the healing properties of medicinal mushrooms and Psilocybin mushrooms in several of his books.

Honors

Forbes on-line magazine wrote: "Dr. Weil, a graduate of Harvard Medical School, is one of the most widely known and respected alternative medicine gurus. For five years, he has offered straightforward tips and advice on achieving wellness through natural means and educating the public on alternative therapies" and listed his web site in their Best of the Web Directory in the "Alternative Medicine" category,[9] listing it as one of the three "Best of the Web" picks in that category.[10]
Weil appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1997 and 2005. Time Magazine also named him one of the 25 most influential Americans in 1997 and one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2005. He received the John P. McGovern Award in Behavioral Sciences from Smithsonian Associates in 2005.
Mycologists Dr. Gustan Guzman, Fidel Tapia, and Paul Stamets honored Weil by naming a newly discovered mushroom, Psilocybe weilii, in 1995.
Weil was honored by the Institute for Health and Healing in San Francisco as their 2006 Pioneer in Integrative Medicine.
He was inducted into the Academy of Achievement in 1998.[11]
Dr. Weil was honored by the New York Open Center [3] in 2004 as having made "extraordinary contributions to public awareness of integrative and complementary medicine."

—http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Weil
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Postby Colonel Sun » Fri Jun 25, 2010 2:52 am

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Postby Colonel Sun » Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:00 am

Doc wrote:
Colonel Sun wrote:
Marcus wrote:Quack medicine and junk science . . . :oops:


The FDA doing it's job. Science - evidence based medicine and food safety.


Unethical (quack?) Medicine that the FDA allows

In recent years, there's been a dramatic increase in the number of children being diagnosed (4000%)with serious psychiatric disorders and prescribed medications that are just beginning to be tested in children. The drugs can cause serious side effects, and virtually nothing is known about their long-term impact. "It's really to some extent an experiment, trying medications in these children of this age," child psychiatrist Dr. Patrick Bacon tells FRONTLINE. "It's a gamble. And I tell parents there's no way to know what's going to work
.

My guess is that very few psychiatrists give the parents any warning. Yet the FDA allows this.

Watch the video.


Well, this thread is not here to defend all the decisions of the FDA.
However, in order for a drug to be prescribed it must have passed all three onerous stages of clinical trials.
Most compounds fail at some stage and are rejected as candidates for prescription drugs.
Is this a perfect, error free, process? No. However, I suggest that it is far preferable to snake oil salesmen past and present.

The more interesting question is outside the domain of the FDA. Why are US psychiatrists diagnosing so many more children than before with serious psychiatric disorders?
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Postby Marcus » Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:18 am

Colonel Sun wrote:Quackwatch: Dr. Andrew Weil


Same ol', same ol' . . . :oops:

Reread Dr. Weil's list of honors received . . :D
“I consider looseness with words no less of a defect than looseness of the bowels.” —John Calvin
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Postby Colonel Sun » Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:28 am

Marcus wrote:
Colonel Sun wrote:Quackwatch: Dr. Andrew Weil


Same ol', same ol' . . . :oops:

Reread Dr. Weil's list of honors received . . :D


Rather lightweight. No medical honours which, considering his field, would be the ones that matter.
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Postby Marcus » Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:32 am

Colonel Sun wrote:However, in order for a drug to be prescribed it must have passed all three onerous stages of clinical trials.. .



Americans stand in awe of how these "three onerous stages of clinical trials" result in so many recalls . . . :? :oops:

Thalidomide, etc., etc., etc. . . . :oops: :oops:
“I consider looseness with words no less of a defect than looseness of the bowels.” —John Calvin
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